J. Barongould Co. Tannery. -- HO Scale

J. Barongould Co. Tannery. -- HO Scale

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$2,975.00
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Part Number:JBCT

Welcome to ...  "J. Barongould Co. Tannery"

Built 1988 by Richard E. Bendever

      Upon completion this J. Barongould Tannery diorama was first entered into an National Model Railroad Association National Convention (1988) meet where it was awarded Second Place in On-Line Dioramas, Key Imports Manufacturer's Award, and a Merit of Achievement Award (117 points out of 124). 

 

 Photo Description #1: The photo at right of this diorama began as a George Sellios Fine Scale Miniatures "J. Barongould's Tannery" and pretty much stayed that way. Why you may ask? Simple, this was the first real contest model I ever constructed ... and boy, was this ever a learning experience for me....

 

 

  Photo Description #2: The image at left is the rear of the Tannery. Although, I'm not afraid of color, the first time that i entered just the main building in a Regional NMRA contest the judges hated the color a stated no one would ever paint a building this color. Years later while driving just along the interstate just north of Knoxville, Tennessee, I discover a huge, entire factory painted this same color blue....

 

 Photo Description #3: The photo at right shows looking down the tracks. What is not shown is the two bulk head flat cars that I had modified to be loaded with pallets of the hides. One flat car was open and being loaded and the second alread had a canvas cover (woman's stocking) protecting the hides from flying off the pallets while in transit.

 

  Photo Description #4: The photo at left is a close up view the two "Hot Glue" trucks mentioned above. The cement mixer body and the garbage collection body were robbed off of European HO scale vehicles and assembled to represent old and abandoned equipment.


 

Photo Description #5:  Basis of this diorama consists of FSM J. Barongould Tannery kit # wood clapboard siding, original & custom stone walls with metal standing seam, tar paper, shingle & corrugated metal roofing.

 

Photo Description #6: Photo at left shows details that began with original FSM casting in addition to hundreds of additional castings (not "Hot Glue" as i had not developed this technique just yet) and details filling every niche and crevasse

 

 

 Photo Description #7: Photo at right shows how I incorporate water into every diorama that I build. The water pouring out of the pipe is obstructed by the photo credit, but there is a stream flowing by this side of the structure with lily pads and cattails in the stream

 

 

  Photo Description #8: The photo at right shows This kit originally came with a few pallets of "tanned hides"-obviously, this was my first attempt to *replicate* details (SEE G. Wilikers description for more of my replication experiences) ...

 

 

 

Photo Description #9: Originally, I really didn't like this "wood" awning and I almost tarpapered it several times. But then after I saw this photo of the sunlight coming through I was Ok with having left it as it was originally modeled.

 

 

   Photo Description #10: Photo at left  shows that this FSM kit originally came with a few pallets of "tanned hides"-obviously, this was my first attempt to *replicate* details (SEE G. Wilikers description for more of my replication experiences).

 

 Photo Description #11: This is a close up of the steam crane and trucks in the back of the diorama. All of the tress were constructed of "weed" roots. I had a landscaping business at the time and my guys would weed flowerbeds for customers and one of them said jokingly, "Hey Ben! This would make a great tree." And they did.

 

 

  Photo Description #12: I think that of all the dioramas that I have built and sold over the years, this one was the most difficult to let go.

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