J.W. Wenrich's Manufactory

J.W. Wenrich's Manufactory

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$1,474.95
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Part Number:JWMC

Welcome to ...  "J.W. Wencich Manufactory"

Built 1993 by Richard E. Bendever

  This diorama began its life as a Pola plastic kit (Galvanizing Works). Frankly, I got sick and tired of people telling me that they couldn't build craftsman kits like I could. I kept explaining to them that they didn't need to build craftsman kits to have really good models. So, in order to prove a point, I built Wenrich's Manufactory.

    J.W. Wenrich's was awarded 3rd Place at the NMRA National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia in the Summer of 1995. The only reason Wenrich's took Third is because it had to compete with my Hooker's Point Lighthouse diorama. In my haste to get to the Convention, I forgot to cover the track so that this diorama would compete in the Off-Line category instead of On-Line.  Wenrich's was awarded 116 points, seven points higher than the winner of the Off-Line diorama. Either way, it was extremely fun proving my point!

 Photo Description #1: Would it be hard to believe that all of the details (except for the figures) are "cast in Hot Glue"? Look closely at the right photo. The barrels, drums, bumpers, chimneys, junk piles & clutter. machinery, ventilators, (and trucks in the rear of the building); they're all hot glue. Yep, and I even wrote an article about it in the 1996 NG&SL "Gazette" magazine."... Still, it was fun to learn some new modeling techniques. I suppose that I got lucky with this model since Dean Frytag brought several of the Contest Judges over to our table at the show and told them what I had shared with him about this being a plastic kit. I doubt I'll be able to slip something like this by the Judges again; or maybe...

 

 

  Photo Description #2: In the image at left, yes, even the car in the front of the image is a Hot Glue casting, as are all the rest of the roof details.  It's a lot of fun taking off the cover of this case and wiggling the chimney's with my finger as the people stare in amazement!.....

 

 

 Photo Description #3: The photo at right shows how I "Americanized" the European style tile roof to a material that we see here in the United States. In addition to the red brick color (originally this model was molded in a mustard yellow color) and the addition of trees made of flower wire and sisal rope fibers, we have a perfectly believable North Eastern industry!

 

 

  Photo Description #4: Don't attempt to adjust you monitor! The photo at left illustrates the risk of activating the patina process on real copper material and the possible variation of colors and changes the copper will change in to. The fluctuating colors of the patina process is all about how temperature and humidity or the lack thereof humidity in the air around the copper. More humidity and cooler temperatures and the patina turns a bright teal green. Not so much humidity and the patina goes to a faded pale white-ish green color. It's all about chemistry...

 

Photo Description #5: The image at right is a good view of the left rear of the structure and its multiple corners that even though fit well for a plastic kit, did not fit well enough to be considered a contest model and thusly falling to the scrutiny of the NMRA judging process. Quite a bit of time and effort was spent coaxing the corner joints with a variety of tools, heat gun and lacquer thinner to soften and fit the corners to judging perfection.

 

 

Photo Description #6: The photo at left shows .

 

 

 

 

 Photo Description #7: Photo at right

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